JetBlue’s version of “reach across the aisles”

JetBlue did a promotional stunt where they would give every passenger on a flight a free ticket to any destination as long as everyone on the flight was in agreement on the destination.  The result: Success.  Costa Rica.

“In a social experiment doubling as a JetBlue commercial titled “Reach Across the Aisle,” the airline offered 150 passengers a free flight, but the catch was that they had to unanimously agree on the destination.”

 

More at Today and at JetBlue’s Facebook page.
(Contributor: Annika Lutan)

JetBlue’s version of “reach across the aisles”

How Citizen Science Changed the Way Fukushima Radiation is Reported

Create low-cost radiation detectors, and let people drive around so that measurements can be made:

“Armed with a few Geiger counters donated by Sythe, the newly formed team retrofitted their radiation-measuring devices to the outside of a car.  Safecast’s first volunteers drove up to the city of Koriyama in Fukushima Prefecture, and took their own readings around all of the schools. Franken explained, “If we measured all of the schools, we covered all the communities; because communities surround schools. It was very granular, the readings changed a lot, and the levels were far from academic, but it was our start. This was April 24, 6 weeks after the disaster. Our thinking changed quite a bit through this process.”

“Since their first tour of Koriyama, with the help of a successful Kickstarter campaign, Safecast’s team of volunteers have developed the bGeigie handheld radiation monitor, that anyone can buy on Amazon.com and construct with suggested instructions available online. So far over 350 users have contributed 41 million readings, using around a thousand fixed, mobile, and crowd-sourced devices.”

More at National Geographic.
(Contributor: Jordan Jackson)

How Citizen Science Changed the Way Fukushima Radiation is Reported

Combating the sinister side of crowdsourcing

This is an article on “Combating the sinister side of crowdsourcing”. It talks about how early detection of malicious tasks can transform our solutions for secure and trustworthy information systems.

“But there’s also a sinister side to crowdsourcing: the ability to organize large masses of paid shills who spread malicious content around the Web. These so-called ‘crowdturfers’ post false product reviews on e-commerce sites and create fake social media accounts to spread spam or malicious URLs. The combined effect of crowdturfing creates ripples through the entire web ecosystem and undermines even basic trustworthiness online.

“At Utah State University, computer science researchers are creating new tools that detect and target crowdsource manipulation. Dr. Kyumin Lee, an assistant professor of computer science at USU and director of the Data Science Lab, recently received a National Science Foundation CAREER Award to combat this growing and lucrative corner of the Internet.”

More at Eureka Alert.
(Contributor: Pragya Verma)

Combating the sinister side of crowdsourcing

Now Anyone Can Tap the AI Behind Amazon’s Recommendations

In addition to Mechanical Turk, Amazon has other services that started in-house (like cloud computing) that they’re making available as a service.  This one (announced in 2015) is machine learning as a

“On Thursday, Amazon unveiled a similar machine learning service, pitching it as a way for any business to use the AI tech the company has spent years developing inside its own operation. Known as the Amazon Machine Learning Service, it’s designed for software developers “with no experience in machine learning,” AWS head Andy Jassy said on stage at a mini-conference in San Francisco.

“The new tool is part of the company’s ever-growing suite of cloud computing services, known as Amazon Web Services, or AWS. Like Google, Microsoft, and IBM, AWS offers all sorts of tools that provide instant access to computing power over the internet. Basically, these are tools that let you build online applications without setting up your own infrastructure. Now, as with its options for servers and storage, you can use Amazon’s machine learning rather than building your own.”

More at Wired.
(Contributor: Derrick Yee)

Now Anyone Can Tap the AI Behind Amazon’s Recommendations

Internet crowdsourcing helps solve some medical mysteries

CrowdMed is a platform on which people can submit medical cases that they’d like help diagnosing.  A recent journal article evaluated the platform’s success.

“Conclusions: Some patients with undiagnosed illnesses reported receiving helpful guidance from crowdsourcing their diagnoses during their difficult diagnostic journeys. However, further development and use of crowdsourcing methods to facilitate diagnosis requires long-term evaluation as well as validation to account for patients’ ultimate correct diagnoses.”

More at Health Imaging.
(Contributor: Rachel Baer)

Internet crowdsourcing helps solve some medical mysteries

To prevent archaeological looting, scientist wants to crowdsource

Sarah Parcek, a 2016 TED Prize winner, has proposed using crowdsourcing to inspect satellite images for evidence of archaeological sites.

“I wish for us to discover the millions of unknown archaeological sites across the globe. By building an online citizen science platform and training a 21st century army of global explorers, we’ll find and protect the world’s hidden heritage, which contains clues to humankind’s collective resilience and creativity.”

More at Digital Journal.
(Contributor: Pragya Verma)

To prevent archaeological looting, scientist wants to crowdsource

Security software giant Avast is crowdsourcing data to reveal the best Wi-Fi hotspots

If you have lots of users using mobile hotspots, why not gather information about the quality of the WiFi links they’re on?

“Avast is crowdsourcing data from its millions of users around the world to serve a new mobile app that tells you where the best and most reliable nearby Wi-Fi is.

“With Avast Wi-Fi Finder — available forAndroid and iOS — users can see what Wi-Fi hotspots are near, and which ones are most secure and recommended by other users. You can also compare networks for speed and look at the security ratings, as verified by Avast users.”

More at Venture Beat.
(Contributor: Pragya Verma)

Security software giant Avast is crowdsourcing data to reveal the best Wi-Fi hotspots